Maryyann-Around the Sun

LittleSpace

The gif above is just a little preview. I thought that the tails that the “planets” left were very beautiful. I wish that I was able to make the larger solar system a gif too, but unfortunately, the outer planets rotated too slowly and produced too many frames.

I wanted to express the idea of planets rotating around the sun while being able to see the path each planet takes. If I were to change my code, I would attach particulates to each planet as they rotated around the sun.

You can see it here!
http://www.openprocessing.org/sketch/109404

float merpercent, vp, ep, mp;
float merradius, vr, er, mr;
float rotatingAngle;
float merx, mery, vx, vy, ex, ey,mx,my;
float frames;
color[] bcolor = {#10163C,#2A4550,#164E64,#291664,#0A343E};
int colr;

/*
if(all the circles aren't at their initial points) saveFrame(blalsjdflkw);
else if (all the circles are at their initial points) exit();
*/

void setup() {
size(500, 500);
merpercent = vp = ep = mp = 0;
merradius = 155;
vr = 165;
er = 195;
mr = 210;
frames = 0;
colr = (#2A4550);
}
void draw() {
noStroke();
if (frames % 1000 == 0){
int index = int(random(0,bcolor.length));
colr = bcolor[index];
}
fill(colr, 10);
rect(0, 0, 800, 800);

fill(#FFAF00,40);
ellipse(width/2, height/2, 150, 150); //sun

fill(255);
rotatingAngle = merpercent/20 * TWO_PI;
merx = width/2 + merradius * cos(rotatingAngle);
mery = height/2 + merradius * sin(rotatingAngle);
ellipse(merx, mery, 5, 5); // mercury
merpercent ++;
if (merpercent % 20 == 0) {
merpercent = 0;
}

fill(255);
rotatingAngle = vp/40 * TWO_PI;
vx = width/2 + vr * cos(rotatingAngle);
vy = height/2 + vr * sin(rotatingAngle);
ellipse(vx, vy, 10, 10); // venus
vp ++;
if (vp % 40 == 0) {
vp = 0;
}

fill(255);
rotatingAngle = ep/40 * TWO_PI;
ex = width/2 + er * cos(rotatingAngle);
ey = height/2 + er * sin(rotatingAngle);
ellipse(ex, ey, 13, 13); // earth
ep ++;
if (ep % 40 == 0) {
ep = 0;
}

fill(255);
rotatingAngle = mp/40 * TWO_PI;
mx = width/2 + mr * cos(rotatingAngle);
my = height/2 + mr * sin(rotatingAngle);
ellipse(mx, my, 10, 10); // mars
mp ++;
if (mp % 40 == 0) {
mp = 0;
}

if (mp == 39){
fill(#ABAED8,60);
rect(0,0,800,800);
}

if (!(merpercent==0 && vp==0 && ep==0 && mp==0))
saveFrame("frames/####.png");
else exit();

}
float merpercent, vp, ep, mp, jp, sp, up,np;
float merradius, vr, er, mr, jr, sr, ur,nr;
float rotatingAngle;
float merx, mery, vx, vy, ex, ey, mx, my, jx, jy, sx, sy, ux, uy,nx,ny; 
float frames; 
color[] bcolor = {#10163C,#2A4550,#164E64,#291664,#0A343E};
int colr;

/*
if(all the circles aren't at their initial points) saveFrame(blalsjdflkw);
else if (all the circles are at their initial points) exit();
*/

void setup() {
  size(800, 800);
  merpercent = vp = ep = mp = jp = sp = up = np = 0; 
  merradius = 155;
  vr = 165;
  er = 195; 
  mr = 210;
  jr = 250;
  sr = 290;
  ur = 330;
  nr = 360; 
  frames = 0; 
  colr = #2A4550;

} 

void draw() {
  noStroke();
  if (frames % 1000 == 0){
    int index = int(random(0,bcolor.length)); 
    colr = bcolor[index];
  }
  fill(colr, 10);
  rect(0, 0, 800, 800); 

  fill(#FFAF00,40);
  ellipse(width/2, height/2, 150, 150); //sun

  fill(255);
  rotatingAngle = merpercent/88 * TWO_PI;
  merx = width/2 + merradius * cos(rotatingAngle);
  mery = height/2 + merradius * sin(rotatingAngle); 
  ellipse(merx, mery, 5, 5); // mercury 
  merpercent ++; 
  if (merpercent % 88 == 0) {
    merpercent =  0;
  }

  fill(255);
  rotatingAngle = vp/224.7 * TWO_PI;
  vx = width/2 + vr * cos(rotatingAngle);
  vy = height/2 + vr * sin(rotatingAngle); 
  ellipse(vx, vy, 10, 10); // venus 
  vp ++; 
  if (vp % 224.7 == 0) {
    vp =  0;
  }

  fill(255);
  rotatingAngle = ep/365 * TWO_PI;
  ex = width/2 + er * cos(rotatingAngle);
  ey = height/2 + er * sin(rotatingAngle); 
  ellipse(ex, ey, 13, 13); // earth 
  ep ++; 
  if (ep % 365 == 0) {
    ep =  0;
  }

  fill(255);
  rotatingAngle = mp/687 * TWO_PI;
  mx = width/2 + mr * cos(rotatingAngle);
  my = height/2 + mr * sin(rotatingAngle); 
  ellipse(mx, my, 10, 10); // mars
  mp ++; 
  if (mp % 687 == 0) {
    mp =  0;
  }

  fill(255);
  rotatingAngle = jp/4015 * TWO_PI;
  jx = width/2 + jr * cos(rotatingAngle);
  jy = height/2 + jr * sin(rotatingAngle); 
  ellipse(jx, jy, 30, 30); // jupitar
  jp ++; 
  if (jp % 4015 == 0) {
    jp =  0;
  }

  fill(255);
  rotatingAngle = sp/10585 * TWO_PI;
  sx = width/2 + sr * cos(rotatingAngle);
  sy = height/2 + sr * sin(rotatingAngle); 
  ellipse(sx, sy, 25, 25); // saturn
  sp ++; 
  if (sp % 10585 == 0) {
    sp =  0;
  }

  fill(255);
  rotatingAngle = up/30660 * TWO_PI;
  ux = width/2 + ur * cos(rotatingAngle);
  uy = height/2 + ur * sin(rotatingAngle); 
  ellipse(ux, uy, 20, 20); // uranus
  up ++; 
  if (up % 30660 == 0) {
    up =  0;
  }

  fill(255);
  rotatingAngle = np/59860 * TWO_PI;
  nx = width/2 + nr * cos(rotatingAngle);
  ny = height/2 + nr * sin(rotatingAngle); 
  ellipse(nx, ny, 17, 17); // neptune
  np ++; 
  if (np % 59860 == 0) {
    np =  0;
  }

//  if (!(merpercent==0 && vp==0 && ep==0 && mp==0))
//    saveFrame("frames/####.png");
//  else exit();
}

Maryyann-Snake

http://cmuems.com/2013/a/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2013/09/Snakes4.pdf

http://cmuems.com/2013/a/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2013/09/Snakes3.pdf

http://cmuems.com/2013/a/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2013/09/Snakes2.pdf

http://cmuems.com/2013/a/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2013/09/Snakes.pdf

I made my wallpaper based on the game Snake. The ellipses start from the left top corner and spirals to the middle and increase in size to imitate a snake chasing its food.

 

Maryyann-Schotter

 

int offset;
float rotation;
int min, max;

void setup() {
size(540, 840);
background(190);
swidth = sheight = 30;
offset = 90;
rotation = radians(1);
min = -1;
max = 1;
noLoop();
}

void draw() {
noFill();
for (int row = 0; row < 22;row++) {
for (int col = 0; col< 12;col++) {
pushMatrix();
translate(col*swidth + offset, row*sheight+offset);
rotate(rotation);
rect(0, 0, swidth, sheight);
popMatrix();
rotation=radians(random(min, max));
}
min -= 3;
max += 3;
}
}

Looking Out

1)  Hair Ball: Edward Porten

hairball

The project Hair Ball caught my attention because of it’s interesting textures and realistic fur movement. I enjoy tinkering with 3D computer graphics and would also hope to explore the 3D features on open-processing as well. I found the “hair ball’s”  ability to change it’s coat so smoothly and react to the viewer’s cursor naturally very alluring. The jump is a little sudden, however and I would have liked it better if there was more elasticity in the creature’s jump and body as it went up into the air. The code includes classes for it’s coat, it’s eyes and it’s movement. There are many properties involved with the eyes that creates a realistic feel to the little creature. Even though the form is so simple, its ability to interact with the viewer creatures an urge to interact back and discover all the little details in the form. Another observation I noticed while messing with the program was that when the mouse is placed over the creature, his fur spreads out a bit near the mouse. I do wish that a better job was done with the fur spreading.

 

2)FLUX: Avcansaray  Caddesi

red

Flux is a fantastical video devoted to the famous sculptor Illhan Koman. It involves a series of generative randomized transformations on red sphere. The continuous movement reminds me of the mimicry of natural patterns or phenomenons, such as tornadoes, whirlwinds and clothes. The sphere evokes strong emotions through its movement and brilliance in colors. There was no source code present in this work, so I wasnt’ able to peek into the artist’s brilliance. In the near future, I would like to incorporate some of this brilliant movement into my pieces as well.

 

3)MagTentacles: Giovanni Carlo Mingati

tentacles

MagTentacles proved to be yet another impressing art piece. Created by Giovanni, mag Tentacles follows a large loop that cause tentacles to emerge and submerge into a green from. It’s randomness and slow speed draws the viewer into the art piece because it almost looks like you’re about to see the other side, but then the tentacles rearrange into another view. For a moment, you see an octopus, then the next it’s gone and turned into a start, then next an anenome. I really like how the form rotates and almost seems to swim around in a blue vacuum, pushing the “water” aside as it moves its tentacles around. I do wish that the background was a bit darker; I think that would bring out the presented object even more. The Rings on the arms make good indicators of where the legs are positioned in the object until the sinc back. The source code is pretty short. It involves different vertices to the draw the beautiful “legs” of the “tentapus:)

Bring the Outside In

nature

I’d like to focus on the beauty according in the natural world for my Blink System. The natural motion of falling snow or rain is one of the most beautiful scenarios in nature. For my Blink System, I’d like to create lights that change according to the weather. I wish to have blink lights installed between two sheets of glass that would be windows for a home. When the weather changes, the blink lights will be alerted through IFTTT with the weather channel. The lights will blink in a pattern of different colors shown below to simulate rain falling or snow falling.

nature2Another similar installation would be through the traffic tunnels that cars often drive through on the highway. Although there are already yellow lights on the top of the tunnels, I feel that it would be both a fantastical and magical experience if blink lights, that were connected to the change in time were also installed to the side of the tunnels so that after a certain time, they would light up to simulate the stars in the night sky. Often in crowded cities, where pollution is a heavy problem, stars would be a rare sight in the night sky. Installing these simple little blink lights to either traffic tunnels or even the ceilings of rooms, can allow people to experience the beauty of nature.

car

 

Creatures that Tweet

I found this really interesting because it showed how the innocent mind of a child can be so creative and so many hidden treasures can be discovered just by working with someone unexpected. We all need to learn how to bend the rules a little and sometimes happy accidental creations can be found.

 

Link together the Internet

ifttt

Out of the two recipes I made, I find the “if date/time, then send sms” trigger to be extremely useful for me. My phone remains almost always within my reach, and I often use it to set up reminders on the calendar. However, my phone doesn’t give me an alarm reminder. The connections with different websites and applications that IFTTT provides allows me to set up many different alarms and reminders from different websites quickly and efficiently. My first trigger is an alarm that sends me a text message in the beginning of the month to remind me to buy dog food for my grandparents back home. The other trigger will help me keep  track of the weather so I can change my attire that day accordingly.

I think very highly of Jer Thorp’s viewpoint on the relations between people with each other. The internet lives off of people trying to find connections with each other, in an attempt to reach out, learn, give and explore. Jer Thorp showed us that an API is relatively easy to program, which I think is such a powerful and important tool. IFTTT is a perfect example of people connecting with each other. Softwares that once had no relations with each other are placed on one website and given the ability to connect together. I think this both allows people to use the website more efficiently, but is also a great way to promote new sites to people, as they browse through the different applications.

In my opinion, Jim Campbell’s “Formula for Computer Art” is a very simple and direct way of showing how items are created. Basic “ingredients” run through the left side, while magically on the right side, a new item appears. Both Jer Thorp and IFTTT shows us the details in the middle of this formula, how different ingredients mix together to become another useful new item.

Let’s Draw

 

Instructions: 

Have one clean sheet of printing paper and pencil ready.
Turn paper portrait view.
1) Shoes have laces. Move to 5.
Shoes don’t have laces. Move to 7.
else Move to 8.
If bored. Done.

2) Use non-dominant hand.
Draw your favorite animal next to other shape.
Animal is mammal. Move to 11.
Animal isn’t mammal. Move to 12.
Cannot be determined. Move to 13.
If bored. Done.

3) Use non-dominant hand.
Draw rectangle.
Length of rectangle longer than other shape’s diameter. Move to 2.
Length of rectangle shorter than other shape’s diameter. Move to 10.
Length of rectangle as long as other shape’s diameter. Move to 14.
If bored. Done.

4) Clap your hands to a rhythm.
Draw out your rhythm.
Rhythm is fast. Share it with a friend.
Rhythm is slow. Share it with an enemy.
Rhythm is just right. Hum it out loud.

5) Untie Shoe laces.
Grab clean paper and draw circle on page.
Fold paper in half so the shorter sides meet at the bottom.
Unfold.
Circle in top half. Move to 3.
Circle in bottom half. Move to 4.
Circle on fold. Move to 6.
If bored. Done.

6) Glance around the room secretly.
Choose an object as your target.
Object is female. Move next to object and continue to 8.
Object is male. Move around object for 20 seconds and continue to 3.
Unable to determine gender. Grab object. You have won.
If bored. Done.

7) Draw laces on paper.
Imagine a color for your laces.
Color is warm. Move to 11.
Color is cool. Move to 2.
else. Move to 4.
If bored. Done.

8) Cross your legs and shake your feet.
Crumble up your paper.
Unfold.
Straighten out your paper and reposition landscape view.
Choose a corner of the paper and draw a contour line starting from that corner to the other
side of the paper until done.
Think of a number from 1 – 100.
Number between 1-33 included. Move to 9.
Number between 34-66 included. Move to 14.
Number between 67-100 included. Move to 3.
If bored. Done.

9) Think of an animal you would like to devour.
Imitate a mating call to try and lure the animal in.
Successful. Move to 4.
Unsuccessful. Move to 2.
Want to try again. Repeat step.
If bored. Done.

10) Fold paper into plane.
Unfold.
Write your instructions on the back of the page.
Refold.
Throw it to an unsuspecting victim.

11) Use dominant hand.
Draw the largest spiral you can manage.
Spiral overlaps something on page. Move to 10.
Spiral doesn’t anything on page. Move to 8.
If bored. Done.

12) Fold paper in half.
Paper is too thick to fold. Unfold and trace lines.
Paper is still foldable. Repeat step.

13) Draw biggest shape possible.
Draw smaller shapes until finished.
Grin.
Hand paper to person closest to you and ask them to sign it.

14) Attempt a cartwheel.
Successful. Describe how you feel on paper.
Unsuccessful. Describe how you feel to another person and draw their response on paper.
Undetermined. Move to a sunny spot and describe your next attempt on paper.
Results: 

instructions-1 instructions-2 instructions-3

instructions-4 instructions-5

Analysis: 

The style of my instructions originated from the tests used to classify difference between subspecies in biology. Each questions contains 3 choices that lead to different choices which each also contain 3 different choices and eventually comes to an end result. Along the way, the test subject’s choices, personality, and preference changes his or her result. What both surprised me and confirmed my hypothesis was the vast differences between results. Although the test itself seemed very long, one result came out to be fairly simplistic.I knew that even if two people chose the same path, their drawings will come out differently through little details in drawing style or positioning, dominance of hand and longevity of patience. If I had a choice to edit my test, I may make some questions a little more ambiguous or simple, so the user is able to apply more of his or her own imagination and understanding of the questions.

Reverse

1) Pick one point that isn’t touching the edge of the paper.

2) Draw At least four lines from the point that are not perpendicular or parallel to each other.

Lines must somehow touch each other, but not cross over each other.

3) Pick one line a draw at least one line perpendicular to it. The new line need not to be perpendicular to the surrounding lines. New lines must not overlap any other lines on page.

4) Continue to repeat step 3 with existing lines and new lines until satisfied with image.

5) Repeat steps 1-4 at another point on page if desired. New design cannot overlap existing lines.

End result.

Reverse

Draw me a Quadrangle

IMG_3864

Drawing the quadrangle through Sol Lewitt’s instructions paralleled the experience of coding. Sol Lewitt’s instructions were precise and specific, similar to the code or “instructions” a programmer would type into a compiler. When programming, one must be extremely careful to include every little detail and check every case, so that the compiler doesn’t become confused. It’s often quite easy to assume incorrectly that the compiler is “smart” enough to know when to automatically check for certain cases. Sol Lewitt exaggerates the importance of detail by over emphasizing direction, position and relativity to other lines on the page which he instructs the audience to draw. Creating the quadrangle proved to be extremely tedious and unnecessarily time consuming because it was actually too detailed. Now I realize that it is amazing how compilers can take over-detailed instructions, analyze and reproduce the product in a logical correct procedure. For compilers, relativity is everything. As a human, we can only contain and consume so much information before comparisons between points or positions start to become confusing. Our intelligence and ability to make assumptions ironically becomes a hindrance.