Final Project – Jo McAllister – Mosaic Maker

My Mosaic Maker is a Photo-Booth-like program that creates image mosaics out of images or videos taken from your computer. There are different modes so you can control what the image mosaic is made up of. After struggling to code this in python using openCV and Numpy, I’ve come to better appreciate those who have developed P5.js, Processing, OpenFrameworks, and other tools that ease the creation of quality graphics and image manipulation. Just the simple task of displaying an image needs so much thought to be executed in the most convenient way.

This first video shows image mosaics created with a simple tint function to change the colors of the pixel-images.

This second video shows a mode that uses an algorithm that sorts recorded images by their average grayscale color, and then finds the most appropriate pixel-picture to place at each pixel of the mosaic.

 

The rest of these are screenshots from my friends and  I playing with the Mosaic Maker.

 

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Johanna McAllister Final Looking Outwards 11

Unfinished brainstorming:

Traces – Physical programming of freeform folding in soft matter

http://www.lozano-hemmer.com/people_on_people.php
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JTBJobqIcBs

http://www.mfah.org/exhibitions/past/shadow-monsters/

http://www.lozano-hemmer.com/videos.php?id=31&type=Projects

http://www.lozano-hemmer.com/videos.php?id=274&type=Projects

https://web.stanford.edu/~edmark/FLV/video.htm

 

About

 

Robot demonstrates pioneering technology by building structure from rocks and string

 

Johanna McAllister – Looking Outwards -10

Momentum is particularly relevant to this week’s theme, because the woman in question, Keri Elmsly, is the director of United Visual Artists, a collective that focuses on large-scale interactive installations. So all the amazing work produced by this group is under her power.

elmsly

The actual machines use two stepper motors that carry out the simple pendulum motions. Though the idea was simple, Keri Elmsly must have been a main driving force in order to produce the project with this final cinematic, immersive effect.

uva-momentum-0 webMomentum_james_o_670

What I like most about this piece is how the pendulums switch from swinging in a natural motion to swinging in a robotic one. Because of the creators’ control of code, Momentum controls physical objects in such a way that blurs the lines between organic and technological.

Johanna McAllister Looking Outwards – 08

Ben Snell wrote a post about the piece Out of Sight, Out of Mind. This site, created by Pitch Interactive, shocks the viewer with alarming graphic representations of the aftermath of drone strikes in Pakistan.Screen Shot 2015-10-30 at 3.03.31 PM While I agree with Ben that the visuals sufficiently convey the sheer numbers and impressively impose a feeling of fright in the viewer, I don’t think the piece is effective as activism. The graphics attempt to bring to light how we, the US, have unjustly killed masses of people.Screen Shot 2015-10-30 at 3.30.13 PM

Though successful in displaying the terrifying power the US has had in killing masses, the piece fails to show that we’ve killed people. In their computational algorithm, they trivialized deaths into a binary form: innocents are red, actual targets are white. Not only is this failure frustrating because they only convey half of the important message, but also because they are perpetuating the stereotype that computers and algorithms can only be cold-hearted and binary.

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Though it does so, the piece’s objective is not to dehumanize hundreds of people. It took on the responsibility of telling the story of not only every drone, but every victim. But that dot on the screen, that blank silhouette can’t tell a victim’s story.

In the end, Out of Sight, Out of Mind successfully contributes to the dialogue on drone strikes’ immorality, though not in the way they intended. Through their failure, they exemplify how large-scale killings damage our perspective of people who are not our own.

Johanna Project-08 Failure

Johanna’s 08 Project Failure

 

After spending a good amount of time trying to debug the following code, this non-functional program below was my original idea. Inspired by Roy Liechtenstein’s layered works, I had planned to isolate shapes (or blobs), determined by whether or not the brightness of their pixels are in a given range of brightnesses. If I were to adjust the range of brightnesses, different shapes would appear. The prospective end result would have been a time-based series of these shapes. In rapid succession, these different frames would have been able to show my sister’s face.

Johanna McAllister Project-08

This is blatantly a small adjustment to Golan’s notes. Instead of plain squares and circles, the pixels are the image itself, modified by the tint function.

Jo Project 08

After spending a good amount of time trying to debug the following code, this non-functional program below was my original idea. Inspired by Roy Liechtenstein’s layered works, I had planned to isolate shapes (or blobs), determined by whether or not the brightness of their pixels are in a given range of brightnesses. If I were to adjust the range of brightnesses, different shapes would appear. The prospective end result would have been a time-based series of these shapes. In rapid succession, these different frames would have been able to show my sister’s face.

Here is the code.

Looking Outwards – 07

Jake Barton creates physical art that people can touch and that touches people. His work ranges from somber memorials such as the famous 9/11 memorial to playful interactive software that better convey the meaning of art in museums.

911 memorial

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He likes to show new perspectives by utilizing technology in a meaningful way. Often times, when new technology is used, the creators are too focused on what the technology can do, so  – counteractively – they fail to add meaning to what their individual pieces actually do. However, Barton has surpassed that flashy, spellbinding novelty. Straying from the stereotype of contemporary, cold robots and code, his work plays with audience’s heart strings.

heart

For example, in Times Square, he helped install a 3D piece called BIG HEART NYC, which was made up of tubes and LED lights that flashed a heart-beat when someone touched it. Bringing the emotional connection to another level, when more people held hands and touched it, the heart beat faster and brighter. Simple but strong, Barton successfully portrayed physical, lively illustrations of love.

touchme

His creations are presented as open platforms. They allow people to personally explore what technology can do: emotionally connect us to our world.